"WORDS ARE, IN MY NOT-SO-HUMBLE OPINION, OUR MOST INEXHAUSTIBLE SOURCE OF MAGIC. CAPABLE OF BOTH INFLICTING INJURY, AND REMEDYING IT." ~ALBUS DUMBLEDORE

Monday, May 9, 2011

Photos and Math and My Quasi-Cross Country Trip Part II

So, we start with the total of my previous post on this. (HERE if you missed it.) And then...

PLUS
One beautiful sunset over the Rocky Mountains

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The Chapel at The Air Force Academy


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The absolutely breathtaking Garden of the Gods



Pike's Peak in the distance


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My favesies part of the trip: The Manitou Cliff Dwellings

Authentic Anasazi cliff dwellings, dating 800-1000 years old 
This was a storage bin made of sandstone slabs and used for storing corn, beans, and squash. The openings at the top and in the front were covered with thin stones, then sealed with adobe to prevent rats, mice, and weevils from entering. 
The area behind the rooms was used for a trash area. They also kept some of their turkeys penned up in it, to feed from the refuse areas. Also, in the winter, burials were made in the the trash piles, which were easy to dig in. When a body was buried there it was surrounded by perfectly dry material, such as ashes, dust, corn cobs and tassels and turkey droppings. The chill of winter prevented decay and the body simply dried out and became mummified. As long as no moisture reached it, it would remain unchanged for centuries. 
This circular pit was the sacred kiva and was used by the men as a ceremonial chamber. Sacred articles were placed in the square openings built into the wall. The small hole in the floor is a symbolic opening in the earth called the Sipapu, and served as a passage way for the spirit of the person to enter and exit at birth and death.
100% chance I'm writing this into a story someday . . . 



This structure was a four family, four room home. The large rectangular openings are doors, the smaller is a window. (The window is closed with a window stone--the doors were closed with door stones.) The small pegs sticking out from the top of the structure were used to hang meat and vegetables to dry in the sun. 
"Their history disappears suddenly from the archeological record in the late 1100 AMD. No Pueblo Indian group living today can trace their lineage back to the Mimbres Indians."
FASCINATES ME.
PLUS
Approximately ONE MILLION shots of me trying to capture scenery in the shades.
Because I'm deep like that.

cloudsies
treeeeeees
PLUS
3 free beers at the Coors Brewery



My personal fave...  


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14,110 feet up on PIKE'S PEAK, baby
My pictures don't do it justice.
Not even close.
Also, I couldn't breathe that high up and got dizzy.

It was fun.







PLUS
6,626 feet above The Royal Gorge.
Whom I lovingly refer to as George.

Yep. I totes walked across this. 


EQUALS
One amazeballs trip. I can't wait to go back to Colorado. I'll def be doing Nashville and Memphis again someday.

You should too.

Let's go together.

*reaches out hand*

13 comments:

  1. These are great pictures. I have never been to Colorado, except for a brief lay-over in Denver, if that counts.I am so interested in going now besides I have to check out the brewery.

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  2. Oh man, this was my 5th grade state report brought to life (only I had to draw a picture of a Rocky Mountain Columbine to go with it, and make a banner of the flag to hang from a stick) (also, my state report didn't mention the Coors Brewery)

    Awesome photos!! I'm dying to take my family to see the Manitou cliff dwellings!

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  3. Aw...LOVE these pictures. Wish I could've been there!

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  4. OMG those pics are amazing!!! It looks like you had a fabulous time. Did it inspire you?

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  5. *sigh* That was my home for two years and those pics make me miss it soooo much.

    *quietly sobs*

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  6. WOW! UH.MAZING pictures! The dwellings are incredible looking!!

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  7. Beautiful pictures! Some of those places pictured were the setting of a middle grade book I just read (Earthling Hero). Cool to see pics right after reading about it!
    Also, I've taken the Coors tour once too! It's my fave brand of beer!

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  8. I love Colorado! My brother lives in Denver and I love visiting him. I need to plan another trip to see him soon!

    We did that Coors tour, too. Love that fresh Blue Moon!

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  9. Love the pics, especially the first one. That is one cool looking village. I've never seen anything like it before. And I can't believe it's in Colorado. I was thinking more like somewhere in Central America. :D

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  10. Lookin good Sara! Both you and Colorado. Nice shades!

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  11. You almost scared me away with the word "math", but after those pictures--I'm so glad I stayed! :-)

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  12. You're wearing PANTS! I saw it!!

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  13. Hey, that lion reminds me of something. Not sure what, though.... :)

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Yay! I love when you have things to add :)